freakinsweetbookcovers:

The Feast of the Nine Virgins - Jameela Siddiqi

The Feast of the Nine Virgins (2001) takes place in two settings: an African village called Pearl in 1969, and London in 2001. There are lots of characters, several of whom are racist towards their neighbors, and most of whom don’t have proper names. The perspective changes almost every chapter, which was at times confusing.

The novel was kind of funny, and I liked several of the interesting characters. Then I got to the end. There were about a dozen twists in the form of connections between the two time periods. The emphasis was on the connections, which became obvious after the first one. The themes in the novel were left behind for of a cheap fable about destiny. It was disappointing. 

fuckyeahmovieposters:

Cloverfield

I was thirteen when Cloverfield was released. There was this mysterious viral marketing campaign that got me really excited to see this modern monster movie. I went with my dad the weekend it came out and was disappointed. It wasn’t nearly as awesome as I anticipated it would be. The handheld footage was hard to follow, it was gross, and it ended abruptly. I griped about it for months. Recently, I’ve heard some people give this film praise. I decided to revisit it and see if I still agreed with my thirteen-year-old self. 
Unfortunately, my library copy of the DVD was damaged, so I lost a minute here and there. It wasn’t too distracting because it worked with the found-footage style of the film. The coolest thing about this movie is that it’s told from a single perspective. It gives the audience a sense of what it’s like to be in the middle of a major disaster: confusion, staying together, and forming plans. There’s also a strong political message: fighting the enemy can hurt the ones you’re trying to protect.
Sorry, thirteen-year-old me. You were wrong about Cloverfield. It’s pretty cool. But you were definitely right about Napoleon Dynamite. That will never change.

fuckyeahmovieposters:

Cloverfield

I was thirteen when Cloverfield was released. There was this mysterious viral marketing campaign that got me really excited to see this modern monster movie. I went with my dad the weekend it came out and was disappointed. It wasn’t nearly as awesome as I anticipated it would be. The handheld footage was hard to follow, it was gross, and it ended abruptly. I griped about it for months. Recently, I’ve heard some people give this film praise. I decided to revisit it and see if I still agreed with my thirteen-year-old self. 

Unfortunately, my library copy of the DVD was damaged, so I lost a minute here and there. It wasn’t too distracting because it worked with the found-footage style of the film. The coolest thing about this movie is that it’s told from a single perspective. It gives the audience a sense of what it’s like to be in the middle of a major disaster: confusion, staying together, and forming plans. There’s also a strong political message: fighting the enemy can hurt the ones you’re trying to protect.

Sorry, thirteen-year-old me. You were wrong about Cloverfield. It’s pretty cool. But you were definitely right about Napoleon Dynamite. That will never change.

A sunny Saturday in Iowa City.

A sunny Saturday in Iowa City.

There are a lot of poor monster movies made for the purpose of being horrible. You know what I’m talking about. SharknadoMega Python vs. Gatoroid, etc. The Host is not one of those. The Host is incredible. It’s a monster movie. What more do you want to know? I don’t even want to tell you about it, I just want you to experience it.

The visual effects look great, especially considering this is a low-budget 2006 film. The horrific imagery is powerful, and kind of beautiful in its own way. How can a monster movie have so many levels? Anyone who doesn’t accept horror as a legitimate genre of film is missing out on some awesome stuff. 

You should really watch The Host on Netflix. Make sure you watch the 2006 Korean film, not the 2013 American teen movie.

freakinsweetbookcovers:

The Nun - Denis Diderot

Diderot was an enlightenment thinker. The Nun started out as an elaborate practical joke on his friend. Diderot sent him letters from a fictitious young girl who was forced into the convent and had horrible things done to her. Diderot wanted to see how far he could take it before his colleague took action to help the girl. It wasn’t really funny. Later, Diderot decided it might make a nice novel.

The Nun is a criticism of convents and the monastic life. The protagonist, Suzanne, has every imaginable atrocity done to her. It’s not a particularly exciting read unless you’re interested in the enlightenment or you hate nuns.

freakinsweetbookcovers:

Zeitoun - Dave Eggers

Zeitoun (2009) is the amazing true story of Abdulrahman Zeitoun and his experience with Hurricane Katrina. It “reads like a novel,” which some  consider the highest praise for a work of nonfiction. This book is emotionally intense, and I highly recommend it for anyone uninformed about Hurricane Katrina and the government’s response. Zeitoun’s experience is a spiritual one, but you don’t have to be religious to appreciate this beautiful story.

freakinsweetbookcovers:

Annihilation, Book Two - various creators

More space battles! Cosmic beings! Silver Surfer is great, but I thought the Nova and Drax stories in book one were the best so far. I’m looking forward to the conclusion, but I hope it’s not too muddled with so many characters.

max-peck:

This is 35 seconds of Neil deGrasse Tyson dancing or: The greatest 35 seconds of your entire life.

The new episode of Cosmos looks great.

faultinourstarsmovie:

One note = one vote. Like or reblog to vote for your state! Go your-state-name-here!

Missouri is awesome.

faultinourstarsmovie:

One note = one vote. Like or reblog to vote for your state! Go your-state-name-here!

Missouri is awesome.